Friday, May 3, 2013

Homeschool Number Crunching

California requires either private school enrollment, or 3 hours of instruction for 175 days a year by a trained teacher.

Implications:

  • This works out to 31,500 minutes a year
  • If I break this into 150 minutes a day (2.5 hours) then there are 210 days of attendance needed.
  • A year without weekends adds up to 260 days. If I subtract 10 weeks (1 week for every 2-month term = 6 + 4 floating weeks for Christmas and summer) then I end up with 210 days.
This site recommends hours devoted to subjects.

Implications:

If I divide the teacher-instruction required minutes (31500) by the school time recommended instructional minutes (54000) then I get a ratio of .583 which I will round off to 60%. So we should spend 60% of the time recommended on each subject.
  • Language Arts – 120 minutes per day --> 72 minutes
  • Math -- 50-60 min / day --> 30-35 min
  • PE -- 200 min/ 10 day -- >20 min per day average (can do some on weekends)
The other classes don’t have recommended times. History, Science, and Fine Arts are listed.
  • If I spend 75 min/day on LA and 30 min/day on math then that totals 105 minutes or 1 hr 45 minutes. 
  • That leaves 45 minutes for other subjects if we do PE separately, 25 minutes if we don’t. 
  • That 30 minutes + are for religion, history, science and art.   Obviously some features of those subjects can be fit into LA (reading, writing, discussing).  
Let's say I allow 15 minutes of time for silent reading.  That leaves 1 hour for formal LA instruction. 

This would be for Paddy and Aidan (grade school through middle school).

High School

For high school, credits depend on Carnegie or Credit Units.
Each 120 hours of instructional time gives you a credit.
Kieron could get a credit based on 1/2 hour of work per day for 240 days.

Here are the graduation requirements for California.  

How it breaks down:

  • 3 courses in English = 120 x 3 
  • 2 courses of Math including algebra = 120 x 2
  • 2 courses of Science including biology and physical science = 120 x 2
  • 3 courses in social studies, including United States history and geography; world history, culture, and geography; a one-semester course in American government and civics, and a one-semester course in economics = 3 x 120
  • 1 course in visual or performing arts, or  foreign language (including ASL) or career technical education. = 120 x 1
  • 2  courses in physical education = 120 x 2
Total 120 X 13 / 4 = average of 3.25 courses a year.
This would be an average of 390 hours per year
 At 390 hrs/210 days you get 1.9 or basically 2 hours a day.  

 For college prep

  • 1 more course of English
  • 1-2 more courses of Math
  • 2-3 courses in the same foreign language
  • 1 course of Art
  • 1  elective
Total  120 x 21 /4 = average of 5.25 courses a year

  • This would be an average of 630 hours of study per year.  
  • Divided by 210 this is exactly 3 hours per day.

More Implications

  • 120 X 60 = 7200 instructional minutes for a credit
  •  7200 / 210 days in the year =  35 minutes per day.  

Hourly Breakdowns
for college prep -- based on daily X 4 years

  • English =  35 minutes per day 210  days per year
  • Math = 35 minutes per day 210  days per year
  • Science  = 17 minutes per day (or 85 minutes per 5-day week) (or 42 minutes per week each on biology/physical)
  • History* =  24 minutes per day (or 2 hours per 5-day week)
  •  Foreign Language = 24 minutes per day (or 2 hours per 5 day week).   To catch up Kieron has to work 360 hours into 1.5 years which is 240 hrs per year which is 75 minutes per day.  
  • PE = 17 minutes per day (or 85 minutes per 5-day week)
  • Art =  10 minutes a day or 43 minutes per week. If done in one year then it is 35 minutes a day.
  • Elective =  10 minutes a day or 43 minutes per week.  If done in one year then it is 35 minutes a day. 
* History Breakdown

  • 120 hours United States history and geography
  • 120 hours world history, culture, and geography
  • 60 hours in American government and civics
  • 60 hours in economics

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